Rochester Statue of Frederick Douglass Torn Down

 In Politics

A statue of famous abolitionist and orator Frederick Douglass was torn down in Rochester, New York’s Maplewood Park over the 4th of July.

There were 13 statues of Douglass set around Rochester in 2018 in honor of his 200th birthday. The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle reported:

“The base and lower part of the statue was damaged, as was a finger on the statue’s left hand. There is historical significance to the timing of the vandalism — though no one can now say whether the timing was mere happenstance — just as there is historical significance to the statue’s very location. The Maplewood Park location includes Kelsey’s Landing, where Douglass, Harriet Tubman, and others helped shuttle slaves to safety along the Underground Railroad.”

Is that the history these vandals wish to erase? Apparently so. They’re not tearing down just monuments to slavery- they’re tearing down ANY statues that remind us of American history. They intend to erase it.

The Daily Wire reported:

“Carvin Eison,who helped bring the statue to the city, told the local newspaper that the statue was too damaged to be repaired but indicated that another statue would be created to take its place.”

Frederick Douglass gave a notable speech at that location in 1882. WXXI News reported,

The incident happened on the same weekend that some local and national organizations have marked the 168th anniversary the speech the famed abolitionist delivered on July 5, 1882, “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July,”  which asks all Americans to consider the country’s long history of denying equal rights to Black people.

That speech was delivered at Corinthian Hall in Rochester. Douglass had lived in the city for a number of years and is buried at Mt. Hope Cemetery.

He was an exceptional orator, and a friend of Abraham Lincoln.

The fact is, ladies and gentlemen, the distance between this platform and the slave plantation, from which I escaped, is considerable — and the difficulties to be overcome in getting from the latter to the former, are by no means slight. That I am here to-day is, to me, a matter of astonishment as well as of gratitude…

…This, for the purpose of this celebration, is the 4th of July …It is the birthday of your National Independence, and of your political freedom. This, to you, is what the Passover was to the emancipated people of God. It carries your minds back to the day, and to the act of your great deliverance; and to the signs, and to the wonders, associated with that act, and that day.” Frederick Douglass, July 5, 1882

He was grateful for his freedom, and grateful for the emanicipation from slavery – a quality sincerely lacking in today’s world.

Featured photo: combination Twitter

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