Navy Commander Fired over Iran Detention Incident

 In Military

Navy Commander Fired over Iran Detention Incident

Cmdr. Eric Rasch, commanding officer of Coastal Riverine Squadron 3, was relieved of command on Thursday after the investigation into the detention of 10 U.S. Sailors by Iran in January.

navy commander

Cmdr Eric Rasch

The command investigation began on January 14. Rasch may be only the first person relieved of command, according to Military.com.  Though the investigation has been reviewed, it has not been released publicly.

Why is that, do you think?

Is Rasch a scapegoat?

Though the Navy insisted they weren’t looking for a scapegoat in this situation, they have started the chopping process. They stated that Rasch was relieved of command because of a “loss of confidence in his ability to command.” (The standard answer).

Capt. Stanfield Chien, prospective deputy of CRG-1 will take over in his place.

According to Military.com,

Rasch enlisted in the Navy in 1989 and previously served as an electronic warfare officer in Iraq in 2008 and 2009, and as the executive officer of the Arleigh-Burke Class destroyer Sampson in 2010. His awards include a Bronze Star.

The Iranians made the sailors into huge propaganda tools, especially after the leader of the Riverine team apologized for the intrusion into Iranian territorial waters (IF they actually encroached on them in the first place). The question remains as to whether this young officer violated military protocol by speaking in the above video.

Military.com also wrote:

A timeline of events released by U.S. Central Command indicates that the riverine boats deviated course en route to a refueling mission during a transit from Kuwait to Bahrain. One boat had a mechanical issue in a diesel engine, which both boats stopped to address while in Iranian waters. It remains unclear how the boats entered Iranian waters and whether the crew knew where they were at the time.

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