Marine Who Went Overboard Near Philippines Declared Dead

 In Military

Cpl Jonathan Currier has been identified as the Marine who went overboard from the USS Essex last week. The frantic search over 13,000 square nautical miles by multiple units from both the Philippines and US proved unsuccessful. The Marine was declared dead on Friday.

He was identified as Cpl. Jonathan Currier, a New Hampshire native. Currier was a helicopter crew chief. He was assigned to Camp Pendleton, California and was serving aboard the USS Essex in the Sulu Sea at the time of his loss.

He was reported overboard on August 9 at around 9:40 a.m. local time. Elements of the 13th MEU, U.S. Navy and Philippine Coast Guard ships and aircraft searched for five days through the Sulu Sea, Mindanao Sea and Surigao Straight to no avail.

The 13th MEU – Marine Expedition Unit -stated in a press release:

Currier, a New Hampshire native and a Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion crew chief, enlisted in the Marine Corps on August 2015 and graduated from Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, in November of that year. He completed School of Infantry at Camp Lejeune, N.C.; Aviation and A&C School in Pensacola, Fla.; and Center for Naval Aviation Training in Jacksonville, N.C.

Currier was assigned to Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 361 at Marine Corps Air Station, Miramar, and was deployed at the time of his disappearance with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 166 Reinforced, 13th MEU, aboard the USS Essex (LHD 2).

Currier’s awards include the National Defense Service Medal and Global War on Terrorism Service Medal.

“Our hearts go out to the Currier family,” said Col. Chandler Nelms, commanding officer, 13th MEU. “Cpl. Currier’s loss is felt by our entire ARG/MEU family, and he will not be forgotten.”

The five day search incorporated 110 sorties and 300 flight hours. An investigation into the incident is ongoing.

 

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Photo: screenshot via Fox5 San Diego

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